Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Welcome to the M-J: Center For Revolutionary Nationalism and Ideological Research and Organization

Myths of the Spaniards and Puritans
Home
Cultural Extremists
On the 'Nican Tlaca' Enigma
The Myth of the Vanishing Race
The Mestizo Concept: A Product of European Imperialism
El concepto de indio en América
OBITUARIES: G. Tantaquidgeon, 106
HOW COLUMBUS CREATED THE CANNIBALS
Christopher Columbus - on trial
Charioteer of the Gods/ Alien Versus Predator
The International Jew
On The Jewish Question
Anthropophagy: TRUE CANNIBALISM!
On Human Sacrifice
Sacrificios Humanos entre los Mexicas, Realidad o Fantasia?
Sacrificios Humanos
Death Be Not Strange
Jack D. Forbes: Eurocentric Concepts Harm Native People and What Do We Mean By America and American
Contra la deformación histórica-cultural
Nuestra Cultura Indígena
On the Spanish Catholic Inquisition
Myths of the Spaniards and Puritans
On the behavior of the Europeans toward the Native Americans
The Role of Disease in 'Conquest'
Germs, Plagues, Famine, Invasion, Friars, And Native Allies!
"Religious Aspects of the Conquest of Mexico"
There is no word for 'Devil' in the Nahuatl Language
Origins of First Americans Research
Links to Further research On the Origins of the First Americans
The Finding and Founding of Tenochtitlan
Attack on the Copernican Theory
Of the basis which the Indians have for worshipping the sun
ADDENDUM II: The Florentine Codex
Rabinal Achi: Act Four--Inside the Fortress
Cultural Visibility and the Cora
Los Voladores and the Return of the Ancestors
War Songs of the Tenochka
Cantares Mexicanos
Viva Mi General Francisco Villa!
In Spirit of Agustin Lorenzo
Corridos y Canciones del Pueblo
Teotecpillatolli
Poems & Speeches & Prayers & the Enemy Invasion
Second Chapter, Which Telleth of the Moon
Men Who Became Gods!
The Mexica or Mexiti
POPUL VUH
EL TLACUACHE Y EL COYOTE
In Ixiptla In Teteo!
Teotecpillatolli: Noble Sacred Speech
Nahua Invocations
Cuento: La llorona
Curatives
Puerta del Diablo: El Salvador
Moctezuma el Magnifico y la Invasion de Anahuak
In Blood and Fire!!
Rules
Excerpts of the Geneva Protocols
Amendment V, and The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 18
Paper Wars
The Defense of Duffer's Drift
The Battle of the Bulge
Truth and Falsehood in War-Time
The Bryce Report
Sun Tzu: Arte de Guerra
Sun Tzu: On Spies
We Believe and Profess
Mushashi: Cinco Anillos
Sixth Chapter, which telleth of the men, the valiant men
Seeds of Revolt in the Americas: Synopsis
'Jihad Against Jews and Crusaders' & 'License To Kill'
CALIFORNIA SENATE BILL No. 670
Jose Ortega Y Gasset: On Plato's 'Republic' and On Forms of Government
Thomas Paine (17371809). Common Sense. 1776 [Excerpts]
Against Exploiters of Lakota Spirituality
Introduction to Deloria's "We Talk, You Listen"
My Tayta Jose Maria and the Indian aspect of the Peruvian Revolution
TO THE SUNDANCE NATIONS OF THE GREAT PLAINS
Philip Deere, Longest Walk speech
Bacbi'awak: 'Made To Die'
Born Gods!
Prologue: "The Stars We Know: Crow Indian Astronomy and Life-ways"
Black Elk Speaks: Visions of the Other World
Miantinomo, Acuera, and Tecumseh, Hatuey Speaks
Chief Seattle Speaks
Chief Red Cloud Speaks
Hopi: A Message for All People
On Judeo-Christianity
"LET'S MAKE A SLAVE" by Willie Lynch
On Slavery
On Indian Casinos
Protocols
¿Quién Gobierna el Mundo?
Frida Kahlo is Not Our Hero!
Links to Movies and Films
General Links to Musica del Pueblo (Songs and Music Videos)
General Philosophy & Mytho-Religious Links
Links to Online Magazines and Newspaper
Researchers Tools and Links
Links to General Science, Almanacs & Geography
Search Engines
Literature & Biography Links
Links to Art, Architecture, & Museums
LINKS: AMERICA INDIGENA / MEXICO INDIGENA
LINKS to Political and Cultural Pro-American-Indigenous Organizations
Who will find peace with the lands? The future of humankind lies
waiting for those who will come to understand their lives and take
up their responsibilities to all living things. Who will listen to
the trees, the animals and birds, the voices of the places of the
land? As the long-forgotten peoples of the respective continents
rise and begin to reclaim their ancient heritage, they will discover
the meaning of the land of their ancestors. That is when the
invaders of the North America continent will finally discover that
FOR THIS LAND, GOD IS RED!! (emphasis, mine).

God Is Red
A Native View of Religion
by Vine Deloria Jr.
p. 292 (last paragraph)
 
READ:
 

Why I Am Not a Christian

by Bertrand Russell

March 6, 1927
National Secular Society, South London branch
Battersea Town Hall

http://www.geocities.com/lmc2124/russell_whynot.html

Myths of the Spaniards and Puritans regarding Native Americans that persist till today.
 
I. the Myth of Cannibalism among the Natives

Columbus believed in and expected to encounter in his travels
representations of the monstrous races, just as he expected to find—
and never stopped searching for—the fabled terrestrial paradise.
Again, Columbus was far from alone in these assumptions. As he wrote
in his letter to the king and queen while returning from his first
voyage: "In these islands I have so far found no human monstrosities,
as many expected," but elsewhere he wrote that within a few weeks of
his first sighting of land he had been told by some Indians that on
other islands "there were men with one eye, and other with dogs'
heads who ate men and that in killing one they beheaded him and drank
his blood and cut off his genitals."

[Notes: "Columbus' Letter to the Sovereigns on His First Voyage, 15
February—4 March 1493," and "Journal of the First Voyage," in Morison
ed., Journals and Other Documents, pp.88, 185. In considering the
veracity of Columbus' claim that the natives had told him this, it is
important to note not only that the Spaniards and the Indians spoke
mutually unintelligible languages but that the Indians could not have
described creatures as having heads like dogs, because they had never
seen any dogs and would not see any until Columbus' second voyage. ]

In fact, there was no real evidence of cannibalism (to say nothing of
dog-headed people) anywhere in the Indies, despite widespread popular
belief to the contrary that continues to exist today, belief largely
based on the fact the Columbus said that alleged man-eaters were
called Caribs. Through Spanish and English linguistic corruption
that name evolved into "cannibal" and although both the more level-
headed of Columbus' contemporaries and the consensus of modern
scholarship have strenuously contradicted the charge, it has stuck as
a truism in the Western imagination. The important point here,
however, is not the spuriousness of the claim that some of the
natives ate human flesh, but only that Columbus and those who heard
his report readily believed, indeed, "needed" to believe, that the
charge was true. If no dog-headed people had yet actually been seen,
or races without heads and with faces in their chests, or one-legged
folk, or Cyclopes, or other bizarre semi-human beasts, that did not
mean they were not there. But for the time being rumors of some
cannibals would do. [American Holocaust, pp. 197-198].

___________________________
II. The myth of No Religion among the natives and
III. The idea of Native Americans being Asiatic: the myth of the
wild men and the monstrous, beastly Amerindian races: THE MYTH THAT
WE ARE MONGOLIANS!!

… Within hours of landfall on the first inhabited island he
encountered in the Caribbean, Columbus seized and carried off six
native people who, he said, "ought to be good servants …. [and] would
easily be made Christians, because it seemed to me that they belonged
to NO RELIGION." Bereft of religion though he thought these "very
handsome and … very well proportioned" people to be, the Admiral was
certain that they possessed gold: "I was attentive and worked hard to
know if there was any gold," he wrote during the second day of his
visit, "and saw that some of them wore a little piece hanging from a
thing like a needle case which they have in the nose; and by signs I
could understand that, going to the S, or doubling the Island to the
S, there was a king there who had great vessels of it and possessed a
lot." This was likely the island of Cipango—or Japan—Columbus
thought, the fabulous place Marco Polo had written about, and he set
out the next day to find it.

… Columbus continued to think he was quite close to the Asian
mainland and that the people of "all these islands are at war with
the Grand Khan" who presumably wanted from them what Columbus wanted:
their precious metals and the wealth of their forced labor. Hearing
what he wanted to hear in the words of a people whose language he did
not understand, the Admiral "was the victim of the same psychological
illusions," one writer has observed, "that lead us to hear sweet
melodies in the chime of church-bells, or to discover in the clouds
familiar features or impressive images of phantastic shapes."
[American Holocaust pp . 200-201]

… The Spanish nobleman Guillermo Coma of Aragon dwelt at great
length and in minute detail on the allegedly "very dark and grim-
visaged" cannibals of the Indies. "They customarily castrate their
infants captives and boy slaves and fatten them like capons," was but
one of his numerous imaginings. And with equal vividness and equal
falsity he described the great quantities of gold that awaited the
adventurous, who could gather nuggets almost like fruit from a
tree. "In that region," he told his readers, there are a "large
number of rivers and more than 24 streams,--a country of such
bountifulness that it is marvelous to describe and unbelievable to
hear about." [American Holocaust p. 205]

… But as time wore on the dominant European image of the New World's
indigenous peoples was one that fit well with other very ancient Old
World traditions: Columbus' story of "men with one eye, and others
with dogs' noses," who ate men after decapitating them, castrating
them, and finally drinking their blood soon became an article of
faith among many Europeans; moreover, elsewhere in the Caribbean, it
was said, there existed islands inhabited only by Amazons and others
with people whose skin color was blue and whose heads were square.
And everywhere, whatever their physical appearance, the sins of the
natives were the same—lust, gluttony, carnality, and all the other
untamed and un-Christian pleasures of the flesh that long had been
the distinguishing characteristics of wild men and the monstrous,
beastly races. [American Holocaust pp. 206-207]

______________________________________
IV. On the myth of Indigenous peoples as Beast of Burden or
miserable non-human servants

Paracelsus' notion of separate and unequal human creations was an
early version of what in time would become known as "polygenesis,"
one of the staples of 19th century pseudoscientific racism. Even
before the Swiss writer committed this idea to print, however, there
was in circulation a complementary suggestion, put forward in 1512 by
Spaniards Bernardo de Mesa (later Bishop of Cuba) and Gil Gregorio,
and in 1519 by a Scotsman named John Mair (Johannes Major), that the
Indians might be a special race created by God to fulfill a destiny
of enslavement to Christian Europeans.

… Spain's philosophers and theologians debated among themselves
whether the Indians were men or monkeys, whether they were mere
brutes or were capable of rational thought, and whether or not God
intended them to be permanent slaves of their Eurupean overlords.

… Even Las Casas—the most passionate and humane European advocate
for the Indians of his own time and for many years to come—felt
forced to acknowledge that the Indians "may be completely barbaric."

… Bernardino de Minaya wrote, a decade and a half before the great
debate at Valladolid, "the common people" had long "regarded as wise
men" those who were convinced that "the American Indians were not
true men, but a third species of animal between man and monkey
created by God for the better service of man." [American Holocaust
pp. 209-211]

_____________________________
V. On the Myth of "Homosexuality" among Indigenous peoples:

Or, as Oviedo had written, with widespread popular approval:
[The Indians are] naturally lazy and vicious, melancholic, cowardly,
and in general a lying, shiftless, people. Their marriages are not a
sacrament but a sacrilege. They are idolatrous, libidinous, and
commit SODOMY. Their chief desire is to eat, drink, worship heathen
idols, and commit bestial obscenities. What could one expect from a
people whose skulls are so thick and hard that the Spaniards had to
take care in fighting not to strike on the head lest their swords be
blunted? [American Holocaust p. 211]

Here, for example, is what the `Pious' Dominican Tomas Ortiz wrote to
the Council of the Indies early in the sixteenth century regarding
the New World's peoples:

On the mainland they eat human flesh. They are more given to SODOMY
than any other nation. There is no justice among them. They go
naked. They have no respect either for love or for virginity. They
are stupid and silly. They have no respect for truth, save when it
is to their advantage. They are unstable. They have no knowledge of
what foresight means. They are ungrateful and changeable …. They are
brutal. They delight in exaggerating their defects. There is no
obedience among them, or deference on the part of the young for the
old, nor of the son for the father. They are incapable of learning.
Punishments have no effect on them …. They eat fleas, spiders, and
worms raw, whenever they find them. They exercise none of the human
arts or industries. When taught the mysteries of our religion, they
say that these things may suit Castilians but not them, and they do
not wish to change their customs …. I may therefore affirm that God
has never created a race more full of vice and composed without the
least mixture of kindness or culture …. The Indians are more stupid
than asses, and refuse to improve in anything. [American Holocaust
p. 217]

If the assertions of Ortiz and others regarding the habits of the
Indians were fabrications, they were not fabrications without
design. From the Spaniard's enumerations of what they claimed were
the disgusting food customs of the Indians (including cannibalism,
but also the consumption of insects and other items regarded as unfit
for human diets) to the Indians' supposed nakedness and absence of
agriculture, their sexual deviance and licentiousness, their brutish
ignorance, their lack of advanced weaponry and iron, and their
irremediable idolatry, the conquering Europeans were purposefully and
systematically DEHUMANIZING the people they were EXTERMINATING. For
the specific `categories' of behavior chosen for these accusations
were openly derived from traditional Christian and earlier Roman and
Greek ideas regarding the characteristics of fundamentally evil and
non-rational creatures, from Hesiod's Bronze race to the medieval
era's wild men and witches. Thus, time and again, the enslavement
and terroristic mass slaughter of Indians by the Spanish was
justified by pointing to the natives' supposed ignorance or their
allegedly despicable and animalistic behavior—as, for example, when
Balboa's troops murdered hundreds of native people in one locale,
hacking them to death and feeding them to the dogs, because Balboa
claimed that some of their chiefs were addicted to the "NEFARIOUS AND
DIRTY SIN OF SODOMY." [American Holocaust p. 218]

 

VI. On the myth of Natives not understanding the concept of Property

From the start, the English explorers' presuppositions about the
human and moral worth of America's native peoples were little
different from those of the Spanish, because in large measure they
were based directly on Spanish writings and reports. … they drew
almost exclusively on the writings of Gonzalo Fernandez de Oviedo y
Valdes, Francisco Lopez de Gomora, and other Spanish adventurers and
writers who, as Loren E. Pennington puts it, "presented a nearly
unrelieved picture of native savagery." [American Holocaust, p. 225.]


The concept of private property as a positive good and even an
insignia of civilization took hold among both Catholics and
Protestants during the 16th century. Thus, for example, in Spain,
Juan Gines de Sepulveda argued that the absence of private property
was one of the characteristics of people lacking "even vestiges of
humanity," and in Germany at the same time Martin Luther was
contending that "the possession of private property was an essential
difference between men and beasts." In England, Sir Thomas More was
proclaiming that land justifiably could be taken from "any people
[who] holdeth a piece ground void and vacant to no good profitable
use," an idea that also was being independently advanced in other
countries by Calvin, Melanchthon, and others. [American Holocaust,
p. 233]

Locke: "As much land as a man tills, plants, improves, cultivates,
and can use the products of, so much is his property. He by his
labor does, as it were, inclose it from the common." (Two Treatise
of Government, section 32)

Moore: "whenever the natives have much unoccupied and uncultivated
land," should the natives object to this taking of their property or
should they "refuse to live according to their [the settlers] laws,"
the settlers are justified in driving the natives from "the territory
which they carve our for themselves. If they resist, they wage war
against them."

("Utopia") [American Holocaust, p. 234]

One of the first formal expressions of this justification for
expropriation by a British colonist was published in London in 1622
as part of a work entitled Mourt's Relation, or a Journal of the
Plantation of Plymouth. The author of this piece describes "the
lawfulness of removing out of England into parts of America" as
deriving, first, from the singular fact that "our land is full …
[and] their land is empty." He then continues:

"This then is a sufficient reason to prove our going thither to live
lawful: their land is spacious and void, and they are few and do but
run over the grass, as do also the foxes and wild beasts. They are
not industrious, neither have they art, science, skill or faculty to
use either the land or the commodities of it; but all spoils, rots,
and is marred for want of manuring, gathering, ordering, etc. As the
ancient patriarchs therefore removed from straiter places into more
roomy [ones], where the land lay idle and wasted and none used it,
though there dwelt inhabitants by them … [so is it lawful now to take
a land which none useth and make use of it."

The most well known and more sophisticated statement of the matter,
however, came from the pen of the first governor of the Massachssetts
Bay Colony, John Winthrop. While still in England, on the eve of
joining what became known as the Great Migration to Massachussetts in
the 1630s, Winthrop compiled a manuscript "justifieinge the
undertakers of the intended Plantation of New England," and answering
specific questions that might be raised against the enterprise. The
first justification, as with Columbus nearly a century and a half
earlier, was spiritual: "to carry the Gospell into those parts of the
world, to helpe on the comminge of the fullnesse of the Gentiles, and
to raise a Bulworke against the kingdom of Ante-Christ," an
understandable reason for a people who believed the world was likely
to come to an end during their lifetime. Very quickly, however,
Winthrop got to the possible charge that "we have noe warrant to
enter upon the land which hath soe longe possessed by others." He
answered:

"… As for the Natives of New England, they inclose noe Land, neither
have any settled habytation, nor any tame cattell to imrprove the
Land by, and soe have noe other but a Naturall Right to those
countries, soe as if we leave them sufficient for their use, we may
lawfully take the rest, there being more than enough for them and
us."

In point of fact, the Indians had thoroughly "improved" the land—that
is, cultivated it—for centuries. They also possessed carefully
structured and elaborated concepts of land use and of the limits of
political dominion, and they were, as Roger Williams observed in
1643, "very exact and puntuall in the bounds of their Land, belonging
to this or that Prince or People." This was, however, not
private "ownership" as the English defined the term, and it is true
that probably no native people anywhere in the Western Hemisphere
would have countenanced a land use system that, to return to Tawney's
language, allowed a private individual to "exploit [the land] with a
single eye to his pecuniary advantage, unrestrained by any obligation
to postpone his own profit to the well-being of his neighbors." And
thus, in the view of the English, were the Indians nations "savage."

(American Holocaust, pp. 235-236)
_____________________________

VII. Myth of Human Sacrifice

For articles regarding this myth please scroll down on this site: there you will find some articles that deal with this topic. 

See for instance, http://descendantofgods.tripod.com/id39.html


__________________________________________
I. the Myth of Cannibalism among the Natives

Columbus believed in and expected to encounter in his travels
representations of the monstrous races, just as he expected to find—
and never stopped searching for—the fabled terrestrial paradise.
Again, Columbus was far from alone in these assumptions. As he wrote
in his letter to the king and queen while returning from his first
voyage: "In these islands I have so far found no human monstrosities,
as many expected," but elsewhere he wrote that within a few weeks of
his first sighting of land he had been told by some Indians that on
other islands "there were men with one eye, and other with dogs'
heads who ate men and that in killing one they beheaded him and drank
his blood and cut off his genitals."

[Notes: "Columbus' Letter to the Sovereigns on His First Voyage, 15
February—4 March 1493," and "Journal of the First Voyage," in Morison
ed., Journals and Other Documents, pp.88, 185. In considering the
veracity of Columbus' claim that the natives had told him this, it is
important to note not only that the Spaniards and the Indians spoke
mutually unintelligible languages but that the Indians could not have
described creatures as having heads like dogs, because they had never
seen any dogs and would not see any until Columbus' second voyage. ]

In fact, there was no real evidence of cannibalism (to say nothing of
dog-headed people) anywhere in the Indies, despite widespread popular
belief to the contrary that continues to exist today, belief largely
based on the fact the Columbus said that alleged man-eaters were
called Caribs. Through Spanish and English linguistic corruption
that name evolved into "cannibal" and although both the more level-
headed of Columbus' contemporaries and the consensus of modern
scholarship have strenuously contradicted the charge, it has stuck as
a truism in the Western imagination. The important point here,
however, is not the spuriousness of the claim that some of the
natives ate human flesh, but only that Columbus and those who heard
his report readily believed, indeed, "needed" to believe, that the
charge was true. If no dog-headed people had yet actually been seen,
or races without heads and with faces in their chests, or one-legged
folk, or Cyclopes, or other bizarre semi-human beasts, that did not
mean they were not there. But for the time being rumors of some
cannibals would do. [American Holocaust, pp. 197-198].

___________________________
II. The myth of No Religion among the natives and
III. The idea of Native Americans being Asiatic: the myth of the
wild men and the monstrous, beastly Amerindian races: THE MYTH THAT
WE ARE MONGOLIANS!!

… Within hours of landfall on the first inhabited island he
encountered in the Caribbean, Columbus seized and carried off six
native people who, he said, "ought to be good servants …. [and] would
easily be made Christians, because it seemed to me that they belonged
to NO RELIGION." Bereft of religion though he thought these "very
handsome and … very well proportioned" people to be, the Admiral was
certain that they possessed gold: "I was attentive and worked hard to
know if there was any gold," he wrote during the second day of his
visit, "and saw that some of them wore a little piece hanging from a
thing like a needle case which they have in the nose; and by signs I
could understand that, going to the S, or doubling the Island to the
S, there was a king there who had great vessels of it and possessed a
lot." This was likely the island of Cipango—or Japan—Columbus
thought, the fabulous place Marco Polo had written about, and he set
out the next day to find it.

… Columbus continued to think he was quite close to the Asian
mainland and that the people of "all these islands are at war with
the Grand Khan" who presumably wanted from them what Columbus wanted:
their precious metals and the wealth of their forced labor. Hearing
what he wanted to hear in the words of a people whose language he did
not understand, the Admiral "was the victim of the same psychological
illusions," one writer has observed, "that lead us to hear sweet
melodies in the chime of church-bells, or to discover in the clouds
familiar features or impressive images of phantastic shapes."
[American Holocaust pp . 200-201]

… The Spanish nobleman Guillermo Coma of Aragon dwelt at great
length and in minute detail on the allegedly "very dark and grim-
visaged" cannibals of the Indies. "They customarily castrate their
infants captives and boy slaves and fatten them like capons," was but
one of his numerous imaginings. And with equal vividness and equal
falsity he described the great quantities of gold that awaited the
adventurous, who could gather nuggets almost like fruit from a
tree. "In that region," he told his readers, there are a "large
number of rivers and more than 24 streams,--a country of such
bountifulness that it is marvelous to describe and unbelievable to
hear about." [American Holocaust p. 205]

… But as time wore on the dominant European image of the New World's
indigenous peoples was one that fit well with other very ancient Old
World traditions: Columbus' story of "men with one eye, and others
with dogs' noses," who ate men after decapitating them, castrating
them, and finally drinking their blood soon became an article of
faith among many Europeans; moreover, elsewhere in the Caribbean, it
was said, there existed islands inhabited only by Amazons and others
with people whose skin color was blue and whose heads were square.
And everywhere, whatever their physical appearance, the sins of the
natives were the same—lust, gluttony, carnality, and all the other
untamed and un-Christian pleasures of the flesh that long had been
the distinguishing characteristics of wild men and the monstrous,
beastly races. [American Holocaust pp. 206-207]

______________________________________
IV. On the myth of Indigenous peoples as Beast of Burden or
miserable non-human servants

Paracelsus' notion of separate and unequal human creations was an
early version of what in time would become known as "polygenesis,"
one of the staples of 19th century pseudoscientific racism. Even
before the Swiss writer committed this idea to print, however, there
was in circulation a complementary suggestion, put forward in 1512 by
Spaniards Bernardo de Mesa (later Bishop of Cuba) and Gil Gregorio,
and in 1519 by a Scotsman named John Mair (Johannes Major), that the
Indians might be a special race created by God to fulfill a destiny
of enslavement to Christian Europeans.

… Spain's philosophers and theologians debated among themselves
whether the Indians were men or monkeys, whether they were mere
brutes or were capable of rational thought, and whether or not God
intended them to be permanent slaves of their Eurupean overlords.

… Even Las Casas—the most passionate and humane European advocate
for the Indians of his own time and for many years to come—felt
forced to acknowledge that the Indians "may be completely barbaric."

… Bernardino de Minaya wrote, a decade and a half before the great
debate at Valladolid, "the common people" had long "regarded as wise
men" those who were convinced that "the American Indians were not
true men, but a third species of animal between man and monkey
created by God for the better service of man." [American Holocaust
pp. 209-211]

_____________________________
V. On the Myth of "Homosexuality" among Indigenous peoples:

Or, as Oviedo had written, with widespread popular approval:
[The Indians are] naturally lazy and vicious, melancholic, cowardly,
and in general a lying, shiftless, people. Their marriages are not a
sacrament but a sacrilege. They are idolatrous, libidinous, and
commit SODOMY. Their chief desire is to eat, drink, worship heathen
idols, and commit bestial obscenities. What could one expect from a
people whose skulls are so thick and hard that the Spaniards had to
take care in fighting not to strike on the head lest their swords be
blunted? [American Holocaust p. 211]

Here, for example, is what the `Pious' Dominican Tomas Ortiz wrote to
the Council of the Indies early in the sixteenth century regarding
the New World's peoples:

On the mainland they eat human flesh. They are more given to SODOMY
than any other nation. There is no justice among them. They go
naked. They have no respect either for love or for virginity. They
are stupid and silly. They have no respect for truth, save when it
is to their advantage. They are unstable. They have no knowledge of
what foresight means. They are ungrateful and changeable …. They are
brutal. They delight in exaggerating their defects. There is no
obedience among them, or deference on the part of the young for the
old, nor of the son for the father. They are incapable of learning.
Punishments have no effect on them …. They eat fleas, spiders, and
worms raw, whenever they find them. They exercise none of the human
arts or industries. When taught the mysteries of our religion, they
say that these things may suit Castilians but not them, and they do
not wish to change their customs …. I may therefore affirm that God
has never created a race more full of vice and composed without the
least mixture of kindness or culture …. The Indians are more stupid
than asses, and refuse to improve in anything. [American Holocaust
p. 217]

If the assertions of Ortiz and others regarding the habits of the
Indians were fabrications, they were not fabrications without
design. From the Spaniard's enumerations of what they claimed were
the disgusting food customs of the Indians (including cannibalism,
but also the consumption of insects and other items regarded as unfit
for human diets) to the Indians' supposed nakedness and absence of
agriculture, their sexual deviance and licentiousness, their brutish
ignorance, their lack of advanced weaponry and iron, and their
irremediable idolatry, the conquering Europeans were purposefully and
systematically DEHUMANIZING the people they were EXTERMINATING. For
the specific `categories' of behavior chosen for these accusations
were openly derived from traditional Christian and earlier Roman and
Greek ideas regarding the characteristics of fundamentally evil and
non-rational creatures, from Hesiod's Bronze race to the medieval
era's wild men and witches. Thus, time and again, the enslavement
and terroristic mass slaughter of Indians by the Spanish was
justified by pointing to the natives' supposed ignorance or their
allegedly despicable and animalistic behavior—as, for example, when
Balboa's troops murdered hundreds of native people in one locale,
hacking them to death and feeding them to the dogs, because Balboa
claimed that some of their chiefs were addicted to the "NEFARIOUS AND
DIRTY SIN OF SODOMY." [American Holocaust p. 218]

For further info. regarding the book:
http://liberalslikechrist.org/about/amholocaust-1.html

http://www.eyapaha.net/stannardexcerpt.html

http://www.hawaii.edu/amst/people_stannard.htm

http://thirdworldtraveler.com/History/Prologue_AH.html

http://www.netstoreusa.com/hjbooks/019/0195085574.shtml

Taken From:

David E. Stanndard American Holocaust: The Conquest of the New World (Oxford)
 
Natural freedom is the only object of the polity of the
savages; with this freedom do nature and climate rule
alone amongst them. . . . [T]hey maintain their freedom
and find abundant nourishment . . . [and are] people who
live without laws, without polic, without religion.



--Jean Jacques Rousseau[1]
 
I am free as Nature first made man,
Ere the base laws of servitude began.
When wild in the woods the noble savage ran.

John Dryden, Conquest of Granada, 1701
Do not allow yourself to be imposed upon by such a gross absurdity.
It is sad stuff.

Dr. Samuel Johnson, 1773
 
Visit: the Immortal and Powerful Mexican-Jaguars!

 
I turn to Simplicity, I turn again to Purity!
 
 
 

Welcome to the Mexican-Jaguars' Stronghold!

Lucio Cabañas

¡De nican para tech quixtizque xtopa tech mictizque!
De aquí para poder sacarnos, primero tendrán que matarnos!
 
 
Since 1521.  Ce-Tekpa Toltekoa. All Materials are Created and Designed by: Mexican-Jaguar Revolutionary Front©; Mexican-Jaguar Revolutionaries  © Formation of the Mexican-Jaguar Military -Lodge(c)  The Immortal and Powerful Mexican-Jaguars©
 
 

 
                        I Heard Nothing!      ....       I Saw Nothing!
 
 
 

Visit:  Tonantzintla Tocihuapillatocatzin

H8
A.K. MX-JGS 4.7
 
PERRO MUNDO!!