Make your own free website on Tripod.com

Welcome to the M-J: Center For Revolutionary Nationalism and Ideological Research and Organization

Los Voladores and the Return of the Ancestors
Home
Cultural Extremists
On the 'Nican Tlaca' Enigma
The Myth of the Vanishing Race
The Mestizo Concept: A Product of European Imperialism
El concepto de indio en América
OBITUARIES: G. Tantaquidgeon, 106
HOW COLUMBUS CREATED THE CANNIBALS
Christopher Columbus - on trial
Charioteer of the Gods/ Alien Versus Predator
The International Jew
On The Jewish Question
Anthropophagy: TRUE CANNIBALISM!
On Human Sacrifice
Sacrificios Humanos entre los Mexicas, Realidad o Fantasia?
Sacrificios Humanos
Death Be Not Strange
Jack D. Forbes: Eurocentric Concepts Harm Native People and What Do We Mean By America and American
Contra la deformación histórica-cultural
Nuestra Cultura Indígena
On the Spanish Catholic Inquisition
Myths of the Spaniards and Puritans
On the behavior of the Europeans toward the Native Americans
The Role of Disease in 'Conquest'
Germs, Plagues, Famine, Invasion, Friars, And Native Allies!
"Religious Aspects of the Conquest of Mexico"
There is no word for 'Devil' in the Nahuatl Language
Origins of First Americans Research
Links to Further research On the Origins of the First Americans
The Finding and Founding of Tenochtitlan
Attack on the Copernican Theory
Of the basis which the Indians have for worshipping the sun
ADDENDUM II: The Florentine Codex
Rabinal Achi: Act Four--Inside the Fortress
Cultural Visibility and the Cora
Los Voladores and the Return of the Ancestors
War Songs of the Tenochka
Cantares Mexicanos
Viva Mi General Francisco Villa!
In Spirit of Agustin Lorenzo
Corridos y Canciones del Pueblo
Teotecpillatolli
Poems & Speeches & Prayers & the Enemy Invasion
Second Chapter, Which Telleth of the Moon
Men Who Became Gods!
The Mexica or Mexiti
POPUL VUH
EL TLACUACHE Y EL COYOTE
In Ixiptla In Teteo!
Teotecpillatolli: Noble Sacred Speech
Nahua Invocations
Cuento: La llorona
Curatives
Puerta del Diablo: El Salvador
Moctezuma el Magnifico y la Invasion de Anahuak
In Blood and Fire!!
Rules
Excerpts of the Geneva Protocols
Amendment V, and The Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Article 18
Paper Wars
The Defense of Duffer's Drift
The Battle of the Bulge
Truth and Falsehood in War-Time
The Bryce Report
Sun Tzu: Arte de Guerra
Sun Tzu: On Spies
We Believe and Profess
Mushashi: Cinco Anillos
Sixth Chapter, which telleth of the men, the valiant men
Seeds of Revolt in the Americas: Synopsis
'Jihad Against Jews and Crusaders' & 'License To Kill'
CALIFORNIA SENATE BILL No. 670
Jose Ortega Y Gasset: On Plato's 'Republic' and On Forms of Government
Thomas Paine (17371809). Common Sense. 1776 [Excerpts]
Against Exploiters of Lakota Spirituality
Introduction to Deloria's "We Talk, You Listen"
My Tayta Jose Maria and the Indian aspect of the Peruvian Revolution
TO THE SUNDANCE NATIONS OF THE GREAT PLAINS
Philip Deere, Longest Walk speech
Bacbi'awak: 'Made To Die'
Born Gods!
Prologue: "The Stars We Know: Crow Indian Astronomy and Life-ways"
Black Elk Speaks: Visions of the Other World
Miantinomo, Acuera, and Tecumseh, Hatuey Speaks
Chief Seattle Speaks
Chief Red Cloud Speaks
Hopi: A Message for All People
On Judeo-Christianity
"LET'S MAKE A SLAVE" by Willie Lynch
On Slavery
On Indian Casinos
Protocols
¿Quién Gobierna el Mundo?
Frida Kahlo is Not Our Hero!
Links to Movies and Films
General Links to Musica del Pueblo (Songs and Music Videos)
General Philosophy & Mytho-Religious Links
Links to Online Magazines and Newspaper
Researchers Tools and Links
Links to General Science, Almanacs & Geography
Search Engines
Literature & Biography Links
Links to Art, Architecture, & Museums
LINKS: AMERICA INDIGENA / MEXICO INDIGENA
LINKS to Political and Cultural Pro-American-Indigenous Organizations
The Return of the Ancestor-God:
 
ON The Dance of the Voladores

[Note: instead of "ghost cult" I will say that it was an "ancestor
cult" as it still is.]

Any discussion of Aztec revitalization should be kept within narrow
bounds until certain documents, still un-translated, can be made
available to scholarship. But the few remarks here offered would not
be complete without at least a brief description of the
mysterious "volador" dance, popular in the sixteenth century and
still being reported from various parts of Mexico and Guatemala.
Allowing for minor variations and despite the fact that present-day
practitioners seem to have forgotten its original meaning, the dance
remains essentially unchanged and remarkably uniform throughout the
vast area of its distribution.

Wearing bird costumes, the Voladores, or "fliers", cluster on a small
platform near the top of a pole. Ropes wound around the pole pass
through grooves in the platform and are tied to the dancer's bodies.
On signal they find themselves backward into the air, and the
platform begins to rotate. As the ropes unwind, the dancers come
whirling downward in continually widening circles until they reach
the ground. In some cases they hang upside down and spread their
arms. While the "birds" are in flight, a performer standing at the
top of the pole plays a trumpet or some other instrument [flute].

Readers acquainted with the `Cantares Mexicanos' will not fail to be
reminded of phrases such as the following (identified by folio and
line number):

I blow my conch for turquoise swans (26: 19)
And they shall appear (26: 21)
Let's have these turquoise-swanlike flowers! These are trogons that
are spinning (25: 17)
For a moment they come whirling, they the Eagles (65: 6)
Roseate swans, cornsilk flowers, are whirling (70: 31)
Moteuczomatzin spreads his arms! (15v: 12)
These nobles are bright as trogons. They are flying along like
cotingas (82v: 15)
And they come, come, and come dancing (47v: 20)
A quetzal has descended, a cotinga arrives (39: 11)
[….]

In fact, the connection between ghost songs and volador dances is
reasonably well attested. According to the Anales de Juan Bautista,
a "water flower-people piece" (axochitlacayotl) was sung and danced
in 1566 in a refectory in Mexico City and repeated outdoors with
a "volador." Chimalpain reports that a "fish song" (Michcuicatl) was
performed in 1593 in the Plaza del "Volador", and the chronicler
Perez de Ribas notes that the "Volador", or "Volatines," was
performed together with the "tocontin", a seventeenth-century
successor to the ghost-song ritual.

In a much-quoted passage borrowed from Sahagun, the historian
Torquemada attempts to explain the "volador" as a calendrical ritual
in which the unwinding of the ropes produces exactly 52 revolutions,
representing the 52 years of the Aztec calendar round. But whether
or not this was a feature of certain 16th century "volador"
performances, it hardly serves as a sufficient explanation. More
encompassing is the early 20th century analysis of Walter Krickberg,
who (without any reference to or apparent study of the "Cantares
Mexicanos") saw the descending "voladores" as ghosts returning to
earth from their celestial paradise. (Emphasis, mine)

Evidently of pre-Columbian origin, the "volador" survived the
Conquest as a bravura piece that required no further justification in
the eyes of Spanish officials. Some, perhaps, were satisfied by the
innocuous calendrical explanation passed along by Sahagun and
Torquemada. But from time to time suspicious were aroused, and on
more than one occasion the "volador" was actually banned. Whatever
the dance's political or cultural significance before the invasion,
we may reasonably surmise that during the sixteenth century it became
an instrument of revitalization.

Whether any surviving ghost-song text has the flier dance as its
program or indeed whether ghost songs were performed simultaneously
with such dances is not known. More likely the two rituals were
performed in sequence, as suggested by Perez de Ribas. Despite this
connection, it is hardly surprising that the intricately cerebral
song recitals died out, while the athletic "volador" still flourishes
in scattered locations throughout the length and breadth of the old
empire—from Mexico City east to Veracruz and south to Guatemala.
Probably these provincial "voladores" were never accompanied by texts
even remotely resembling the "Cantares." … In the "Cantares",
nevertheless, we have the supreme literary expression of a far-flung
ghost cult, which, though its symbolism may have varied over the
centuries, continues to serve as a reminder of Mexico's past and as
at least one means of keeping alive, if not revitalizing, its native
heritage.


[The verb "netloca" (to believe) in the Cantares it signifies
adherence to the ghost (ancestor) song doctrine.]


John Bierhorst, trans., Cantares Mexicanos: Songs of the Aztecs,
Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1985.

See Also:
 
The Cosmic Serpent:
DNA and the Origins of Knowledge

Narby, Jeremy
(1999)
New York: Jeremy P. Tarcher/Putnam
 
Excerpt(s):
 
 
 The Dance of the Voladores/ Photos
 
 

The Dance of the Voladores and Cantares Mexicanos:

In a much-quoted passage borrowed from Sahagun, the historian
Torquemada attempts to explain the "volador" as a calendrical ritual in which the unwinding of the ropes produces exactly 52
revolutions,representing the 52 years of the Aztec calendar round.
But whether or not this was a feature of certain 16th century "volador" performances, it hardly serves as a sufficient explanation. More encompassing is the early 20th century analysis of Walter Krickberg, who (without any reference to or apparent study of the "Cantares Mexicanos") saw the descending "voladores" as ghosts returning to earth from their celestial paradise. (Emphasis, mine)

John Bierhorst, trans., Cantares Mexicanos: Songs of the Aztecs, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1985

See photos of the dance of the Voladores from the Totonac (Papantla) region (Mexico, Veracruz):
http://www.vanilla.com/html/globe-voladores.html

Excellent photos of the 'Sacred Pole' and Voladores DANCERS from the Quiche Maya (Guatemala):

http://www.theosociety.org/pasadena/popolvuh/pv-8.htm (scroll down)

Visit: the Immortal and Powerful Mexican-Jaguars!

 
I turn to Simplicity, I turn again to Purity!
 
 
 

Welcome to the Mexican-Jaguars' Stronghold!

Lucio Cabañas

¡De nican para tech quixtizque xtopa tech mictizque!
De aquí para poder sacarnos, primero tendrán que matarnos!
 
 
Since 1521.  Ce-Tekpa Toltekoa. All Materials are Created and Designed by: Mexican-Jaguar Revolutionary Front©; Mexican-Jaguar Revolutionaries  © Formation of the Mexican-Jaguar Military -Lodge(c)  The Immortal and Powerful Mexican-Jaguars©
 
 

 
                        I Heard Nothing!      ....       I Saw Nothing!
 
 
 

Visit:  Tonantzintla Tocihuapillatocatzin

H8
A.K. MX-JGS 4.7
 
PERRO MUNDO!!